I have never been on any kind of diet. I have never been more than 10-15lbs more than I should be. I have no health concerns. I am 55yrs. old with an enormous appetite. Almost everyone I know has been on a diet. My observation is that once you start dieting you start this yo-yo relationship with gaining and losing weight. I have counseled my children to stay away from fad diets. Moderation is enjoyable and sustainable. I love all-inclusive resorts and cruises. If I gain a bit I just cut back a bit. I don’t have a sweet tooth and I am cautious about potato chips and high fat snacks/foods. I love life, I love food in all its variety and I exercise moderately. I don’t have a gym membership. I get a little fresh air with a 30min easy jog.
Thanks for the info. Still so CONFUUUUSSED. There is so much info on both sides that sounds perfectly logical (and I am a total sucker for a logical argument.) I remember the not so delicious food change when my parents needed to cut out salt and other stuff for high blood pressure and cholesterol which is now totally wrong. The food pyramid, which is now totally wrong. I’ve been on diets before – Weight Watchers – lost weight (very very very slowly) but felt like I was starving ALL THE TIME; Carb Limiting – lost nothing; No processed foods – lost nothing; Counting calories and food journals – seriously, if you have a job who has time for that; Keto – losing about 2 lbs a week, but think I’d rather just fast than eat this food combo so this is probably not sustainable for me. Isn’t there just a logical, healthy way of eating that requires no counting, no weird food, no avocados (well that’s just me – I think they’re gross), that does all that good stuff like no inflammation, good gut biome, etc. and I can lose weight without feeling so hungry?
I have to thank you for presenting a more rational view of keto than I have seen presented by other dietitians. However I am a Type 1 diabetic, and ahem, also a registered dietitian and since finding keto a year ago would not have any reservation in guiding a pt, especially a diabetic, to eat keto. I find the diet far less restrictive than a vegetarian or vegan diet, and food cravings have completely been eliminated. I’m far more satiated when I eat and I have no problem adhering to this way of eating. The fact that dietitians advise eating 45-60 g CHO per meal to a diabetic (someone who essentially has a carb intolerance) is absolutely ludicrous to me. As a T1D I’m off the blood sugar roller coaster, no longer have dangerous lows and have achieved an A1c of 5.1, which means no long-term complications. I think the main fear in the mainstream media comes from that F word–fat. With the dawn of the low-fat era in the 1960s, sugar and carb consumption skyrocketed, fat consumption plummeted and what happened as a result? Yes, that’s right, rates of overweight and obesity skyrocketed. Insulin is the body’s primary fat storage hormone and carb consumption triggers insulin. The reason a keto diet works for weight loss (more than just water weight from loss of glycogen stores) is because insulin levels stay low, which allows for the mobilization of fat.
Total carbs is not a precise indicator of the carb content of a food. When you see “total carbs” on a food label, the number beside it represents the cumulative total of grams of dietary fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohol that are in that food item or beverage. Net carb content, on the other hand, relates to the carb content of the food that is digested at four calories per gram and impacts your ketones levels.

keto diet joe rogan

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