Traditionally, in the sports nutrition field, we talk about the importance of timing carbohydrate and fluid intake on improving sports performance. For some time now, research has been looking at the role of very low carbohydrate diets on sports performance. Trailblazers in keto and sports performance research like Dr. Stephen Phinney have been conducting studies in this area since the 80s. In one of his studies, the glycogen stores of cyclists on a keto diet were not completely depleted and lipid oxidation was increased. Researchers concluded that the body was able to adapt to the lack of carbohydrates and preserve what was needed to use the fat as fuel.  However, based on the VO2 max breath test, since the body was attempting to preserve the carbohydrate during the exercise, it appears that the intensity of the exercise was limited. In a more recent study, off-road cyclists following a keto diet experienced small improvements, but still not significant enough to make strong conclusions.

What triggers Parkinsons


A. When you first start a ketogenic diet, you may temporarily experience flu-like symptoms such as dizziness, brain fog, irritability, stomach trouble, insomnia, and more, as your body switches from burning glucose to burning fat. These symptoms can occur for a few days up to a few weeks and are a natural reaction that you’re encouraged to push through. You can alleviate symptoms by increasing hydration, electrolytes, and natural salt consumption. Get lots of rest and exercise gently. Lastly, consuming activated charcoal binds any toxins stored in the fat you’re shedding and can reduce nasty detox symptoms.
While I do appreciate the amount of research that went into this article, I need to weigh in here— no pun intended. I am a 44 year old woman who suddenly and inexplicably gained a lot of weight at about age 20 and pretty much (albeit a few bouts of massive dieting and exercising) have remained fat until the age of 42. I had always been thin without having to give my lifestyle much thought before my sudden weight gain — so I have spent the last 20+ years becoming pretty proficient on learning how the body uses fuel. I have had success losing great amounts of weight a few times in my life — twice reducing my calories the “nutritional counseling” way — using the old school and outdated food pyramid and tons of exercise. It took literally having to spend hours and hours at the gym — being miserably hungry all the time — only to achieve slow progress at the scale. Months and months I would spent this way only to gain the weight right back the minute that I let go of the reins. I’m always hearing about “sustainable lifestyle changes” from you nutritionists— an I believe in daily exercise — but that lifestyle was completely unsustainable in the long term which is why so many people are unsuccessful.

I am Keto proponent. I have been through muscle cramps when missing greens while riding my bike for 100 km in 5.5 hours (and I am going on 64!) Getting kale and spinach and parsley is a must, getting the fruit whole is a must. Consumption of “good” fats like coco, olive, avocado oils definitely does not hurt. Consumption of meat – and of organs, yes, organs – is very important. And finally, monitoring the body reaction and measuring ketones and glucose helps; I am doing observations regularly. What about G=4.2 and K=.3 in the morning? It is not ketogenic state per se, but in the morning my muscles do not need much fuel, and my frontal cortex and red blood cells need only minimum glucose. What about G=5.4 and K=3.6 in the third hour of bike ride, with acetone in the breath high and ketone disposal in urine very low? What about post-exercise levels of G=4.4 and K=1.2, with almost no acetone in breath and urine levels going sky-high because the body needs not ketones any more?
Total carbs is not a precise indicator of the carb content of a food. When you see “total carbs” on a food label, the number beside it represents the cumulative total of grams of dietary fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohol that are in that food item or beverage. Net carb content, on the other hand, relates to the carb content of the food that is digested at four calories per gram and impacts your ketones levels.

keto diet joe rogan

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