Fortunately, I read your post before I watched your video. I am considering trying the Keto diet and am looking for honest, scientific, and wise counsel about it. Your research seems to be pretty thorough, though missing some facts, but still decent information. I feel like I can make an informed decision based on what I read, plus have a good direction for more research. However, after watching your juvenile and exaggerated video, based on the weirdest things (possibly ONE person actually eats) that “Keto Dieters eat,” I’m not sure what I think of your post. The video completely undermines your believability as a “dietician.” If someone told you they ate dog poop for breakfast, would you have tried that? Come on. Professionalism goes a long way. As a dietician, I would think you would be shooting for credibility. Aside from “seriously pissing off” your viewers, you killed your own voice of credibility.
The only difficulty with some of these studies is that they tend to have small sample sizes, like this one that only has five cyclist participants and the data was largely skewed by the fact that only ONE cyclist experienced a large enhancement of exercise capacity after the keto diet. Their studies also tend to be short term. Back in 2014, Phinney and scientist Tim Noakes wrote an editorial that stated that in the past 31 years, there have only been a handful of studies measuring sports performance and low carb diets. Out of a total of 11, only 3 found exercise improvements.

Total carbs is not a precise indicator of the carb content of a food. When you see “total carbs” on a food label, the number beside it represents the cumulative total of grams of dietary fiber, sugar, and sugar alcohol that are in that food item or beverage. Net carb content, on the other hand, relates to the carb content of the food that is digested at four calories per gram and impacts your ketones levels.

keto diet joe rogan

×