There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical applications. Most anyone can safely benefit from eating a low-carb, high-fat diet. Below, you’ll find a short list of the benefits you can receive from a ketogenic diet. For a more comprehensive list, you can also read our in-depth article here >

Who started keto diet


So where did the ketogenic diet come from? Interestingly enough, this fad diet didn’t spark from a celebrity endorsement or some guy missing a medical license. There’s evidence of the keto diet being used back in the early 1920s to treat severe childhood epilepsy and it’s still being used today for that purpose. Research suggests that the production of ketones may influence neurotransmitter activity in neurons allowing for a reduction in seizure attacks. A recent Cochrane Review demonstrated a 30-40% reduction in seizures compared with non-keto diet controls. One thing to keep in mind, however (which is a theme when discussing the keto diet) is that it’s generally difficult to adhere to and difficult to tolerate for a lot of people. In other words, people go on it and then come off it pretty damn quick.

Is constipation a sign of ketosis


I also want to add that I absolutely agree with your verdict! As a type 1 diabetic who has experienced the sickening feeling of ketones’ presence, and known about the dangers of ketoacidosis since childhood, the concept of this diet for weight loss has always rubbed me the wrong way and struck me as a bit off (although I know ketosis is a different thing and is alright for the body, its extreme form is ketoacidosis, after all). I also have seen the diet, used for weight loss, cause dramatic results that then rebounded afterwards. I understand it is an incredible revelation in treating some epileptic individuals, and I see how it makes sense and can be helpful for type 2 diabetics or pre-diabetics. But as for a weight-management diet, like with everything else in life, I think we should strive balance. And enjoying summer peaches!
Dr. Jeff Volek performed a similar study in obese males that also looked at possible effects of resistance training in combination with the diet. In this study, Dr. Volek used a true ketogenic diet consisting of high fat and low carbohydrates. He found a comparable pattern and magnitude of change in body composition to the aforementioned study (6). He later performed another study including men and women. In this study (7) the participants were instructed to not change any physical activity behaviors and to continue with their daily lifestyle habits. The two diet intervention groups consisted of a very low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (VLCD: 9%C: 63%F: 28%P) and a low-fat diet (58%C: 22%F: 20%P). The amount of calories that were restricted for both groups was based on the individuals’ resting metabolic rate (RMR). The women in the low-carbohydrate, ketogenic group responded much more favorably to the diet, especially in terms of trunk fat loss. Meanwhile, both men and women lost significantly more fat in the VLCD group than in the low- fat diet group. As expected, RMR decreased in both groups; however, the men in the VLCD group maintained a much higher RMR relative to their body mass than those the low-fat condition did. This has important practical applications, as most people who diet tend to have decreased metabolisms that make take a long time to recover back to baseline and in some cases may never fully return to normal.
I have never tried a keto diet (don’t like the idea myself) but I am what you could call moderately (or “liberal”) low carb. Around 125g max net per day, which as you likely know is half the RDA of 250g. I get most of the rest of my energy from protein and some for fat. The RDA of protein, around 50g, is only just enough to sustain muscle of a sedentary or low movement individual – and this is proven by the fact that a lot of people who hit the gym eat easily 2-3x the RDA of protein.

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