High-carb diet – like SAD – is outright harmful and statistically it is proven, since the overall health of North American population deteriorates steadily since the 70s. Low-carb, high-fat diet is definitely less harmful; in my opinion it could be beneficial for the vast majority of humans. Whether one can plough through the addiction of sweets, that is totally different story.
I have found eating low-carb, high-fat to be easier than other diets because I feel satiated, and I have good energy and feel warm (I usually feel cold in the winter). I can also skip snacking because I don’t get “hangry”. I totally understand if it’s not for everyone; people are different with different genetic expressions, and their bodies will respond in different ways. But if you’re going to give it a try, it make take a couple of weeks before your body is adapted to burning fat instead of glucose. Make sure to get enough salt, and eat lots of vegetables (if you don’t like spinach salad, roasted cauliflower or fired mushrooms, this diet may not be for you).
Cutting out a whole food group (or in this case, more than one) is a dietitian’s worse nightmare. It not only makes it a really hard diet to follow, but also stresses the hell out of your body and makes it work a lot harder to keep up. In a US News & World Report’s review of 2018 diet, the ketogenic diet came in last place as a sustainable means to weight loss because of its restrictive nature.
In 2014 — for the first time — I discovered a low carb diet called Ideal Protein. It’s different from Keto in that you also keep a low fat intake as well. I can’t speak for Keto as I’ve not done it personally, but I lost 80 pounds on Ideal Protein in 5 months. It fit into my life as a busy mom and returning college student because I didn’t have to spend hours at the gym. I just ate low carb and moderate protein.
Having said that, there are also studies suggesting that long term carbohydrate restriction diets (aka. the keto diet) may result in fast short term weight loss but people gain it all back in the long term. An RCT put 63 individuals on a low-fat diet or a low carb diet, and the study found the low carb dieters lost more weight compared to the low fat group by month 3 and 6, but that the weight loss evened out by month 12. This was confirmed by a Meta-analysis which found that while low-carbers lost more weight than low-fat dieters but the differences disappeared by the one year mark.

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I can buy clothes off the rack. Better than being obese. My brain is sharper. I get more stuff done. I don’t sit around. I feel like I can feel the fat melting off. I have trouble sometimes eating enough. After 40 years if being very obese on and off, I think I am better off. I hope to use it when I need it after I reach my goal. The blood tests will prove it.
From a personal standpoint. I’ve been on the Ketogenic diet now for 5 months. My A1C went from 8.6 to 6.3. I no longer require medication. I get a full panel done on my blood every 6 months and my blood pressure is dropping. The doctor says if it continues, I won’t need the medication anymore either. I do not find it hard to stay on the diet as there are many delivery services that you can use when you simply don’t. I’ve lost 41 lbs. I work out 5 days a week, lifting weights, about 1 hour a day. The mistake most people make is thinking of this as a diet. This mentality will cause a person to fail. It is a life style change that needs to be permanent. The medical community and bad advice from gurus and nutritionists that really do not understand this diet or are informed of the latest research and studies continue to provide inaccurate information.

A systematic review of 26 short-term intervention trials (varying from 4-12 weeks) evaluated the appetites of overweight and obese individuals on either a very low calorie (~800 calories daily) or ketogenic diet (no calorie restriction but ≤50 gm carbohydrate daily) using a standardized and validated appetite scale. None of the studies compared the two diets with each other; rather, the participants’ appetites were compared at baseline before starting the diet and at the end. Despite losing a significant amount of weight on both diets, participants reported less hunger and a reduced desire to eat compared with baseline measures. The authors noted the lack of increased hunger despite extreme restrictions of both diets, which they theorized were due to changes in appetite hormones such as ghrelin and leptin, ketone bodies, and increased fat and protein intakes. The authors suggested further studies exploring a threshold of ketone levels needed to suppress appetite; in other words, can a higher amount of carbohydrate be eaten with a milder level of ketosis that might still produce a satiating effect? This could allow inclusion of healthful higher carbohydrate foods like whole grains, legumes, and fruit. [9]

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