The premise of the ketogenic diet for weight loss is that if you deprive the body of glucose—the main source of energy for all cells in the body, which is obtained by eating carbohydrate foods—an alternative fuel called ketones is produced from stored fat (thus, the term “keto”-genic). The brain demands the most glucose in a steady supply, about 120 grams daily, because it cannot store glucose. During fasting, or when very little carbohydrate is eaten, the body first pulls stored glucose from the liver and temporarily breaks down muscle to release glucose. If this continues for 3-4 days and stored glucose is fully depleted, blood levels of a hormone called insulin decrease, and the body begins to use fat as its primary fuel. The liver produces ketone bodies from fat, which can be used in the absence of glucose. [1]
But this sort of “low-carbohydrate, high-fat” (LCHF) diet, as Noakes calls it, is still far from mainstream. It takes serious dedication to drop your daily total carb intake to below 50 grams (or 20–30g of net carbs, which are sans fiber), the equivalent of a single cup of brown rice. The USDA Dietary Guidelines were just changed in January to mention the need to limit intake of added sugars and refined carbs like bread, rice, pasta, cookies, and crackers, which spike blood sugar more rapidly than candy. Check the label of nearly any sports drink, and it’s most likely loaded with natural or added sugar. Go to the grocery store today and the labels are awash with the message of “low fat,” “no fat,” or “zero fat.”
All I know is that by cutting out foods like bread, that have arguably no nutritional value whatsoever, I’ve lost fat weight and have been able to retain (and grow) muscle through workouts. Not only that, but I am markedly stronger, and I don’t suffer any effects of malnutrition. I don’t want to be one of these people that despite eating a “balanced diet” simply gets fatter as they get older, because of how carbs screw up your insulin resistance levels and cause your body to store fat (particularly visceral fat in men) where it isn’t needed.

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Let’s face it: a ketogenic diet is not the easiest diet to follow — or understand! This is why we love books that simplify the process, like Keto Made Easy: 100+ Easy Keto Dishes Made Fast to Fit Your Life. You don’t have to miss out on your favorite foods with these easy-to-follow, easy-to-make recipes from this popular food blogger duo. It also has five meal plans for different kinds of keto diets, including vegetarian. A Bible for many keto dieters, Leanne Vogel’s The Keto Diet Book: The Complete Guide to a High-Fat Diet not only boasts 125 recipes but also is a great resource chock full of information to answer your every question about this sometimes perplexing diet. We love that it has five 28-day meal plans, taking the stress out of planning every meal for weeks or even months on end.
My favorite drink is: 1/3 glass of Spicy Low Sodium V8 + 1/3 water + 1/3 DIET Tonic Water + 1 rounded tsp Stevia. Outstanding !! After I plateaued out after 35 lb loss on keto I continued to drink this and had no difficulties losing 9 additional lbs. I simply do not believe the keto prohibitions on ANY sweeteners…. they have zero carbs & calories. Exactly HOW could they effect metabolism? IMHO THEY DON’T! I don’t believe that superstition, it’s biblical.
You didn’t convert grams to calories. You must convert the grams of fat and protein to calories and then calculate your macronutrient percentages. Calorie percentages, not gram percentages, are what the recommended keto percentages are based on. Usually, once you account for the fact that one gram of fat has five more calories than one gram of protein the calorie percentages will end up being what you expect from a typical keto diet.

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I have never tried a keto diet (don’t like the idea myself) but I am what you could call moderately (or “liberal”) low carb. Around 125g max net per day, which as you likely know is half the RDA of 250g. I get most of the rest of my energy from protein and some for fat. The RDA of protein, around 50g, is only just enough to sustain muscle of a sedentary or low movement individual – and this is proven by the fact that a lot of people who hit the gym eat easily 2-3x the RDA of protein.

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