It’s important we distinguish between the process of ketoacidosis seen in type 1 diabetes and this ketosis that so many people on the keto diet are striving for. If someone with diabetes lacks enough insulin and/or does not eat enough carbohydrates, they risk entering a state known as ketoacidosis. For those with uncontrolled diabetes, this can increase the levels of ketones in the blood, increasing the acidity of the blood, and potentially leading to a coma or even death. In ketosis for a healthy individual, the level of ketones in the blood never reaches these crazy high levels so it’s generally safe for the average healthy individual.

A great little book with some really simple, quick and easy recipes. This is ideal for beginners and newcomers to the diet or those who don’t have much experience preparing their own meals. Often it can be quite daunting for those looking to begin the keto diet, and as such, this is a really helpful book as recipes are broken down into easy-to-follow, step-by-step guides. As part of breaking down the ketogenic diet, this book also looks at the nutritional information which is available in each recipe to ensure that you know exactly what you are putting into your body when you make these meals.
With the high intake of fat, are we concerned about the high intake of cholesterol? YEP. A study using the keto diet as a form of treatment for epileptic seizures in children found that after 6 months of administering the diet, triglyceride levels increased, total cholesterol levels increased, and HDL and LDL increased. These results suggest that over time, a keto diet may lead to an increased risk of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. In the same ten-year study, 40% of patients developed hypertriglyceridemia and 29% of patients experienced hypercholesterolemia. So, if heart disease runs in your family, you may want to bow out now.
Hi Danielle, it’s all about learning to read labels and the nutrition label before purchasing something! I also double heck the ingredients before I buy packaged products. I also have an ongoing list of approved veggies that I keep in my phone so that I know what I can buy and the variety I can buy so I don’t get in a food funk! Definitely let me know how I can help further! Like posting a label guide? Complete veggie list? Let me know! 

Do you get headaches when you cut out sugar


When you consider what excessive consumption of carbohydrates (and I do consider the RDA of 250g excessive) do to the human body I find it kind of sad that nutritionists still by and large pedal carbs as a hugely necessary forerunner to being a functioning human. The sugar industry pedalled the “fat is bad” lie for decades and the introduction of low fat foods duped millions of people into becoming obese. A lot of people still don’t get, for instance, the difference between blood cholesterol and dietary cholesterol.
People claiming huge benefits of these supplements – despite the lack of solid scientific support – may sometimes have a financial reason to believe in the supplements. Some of these products are sold under a multi-level marketing arrangement, where sales people are paid based on commission. For example, the company Prüvit sells drinkable ketones, called KETO//OS with a multi-level marketing structure.

How common is Pouchitis


Abbey, I appreciate the article, it’s helped me come to a decision on KETO. I’ve been on KETO for over 3 months, I’m a woman of 55 and post menopausal with a good 40 lbs of fat to lose. I work out 3-5 per week at an intense level doing cardio, HIIT and weight training and I have NOT lost any weight (ok, a single pound). I am in Ketosis most of the time (testing often) and I’ve been eating 1,200 to 1,300 cals per day. My carb intake around 15-20 grams per day, Fat around 90 grams and protein was about 45 grams until I increased it after learning I had lost muscle mass confirmed on a SECA scale.
A systematic review of 26 short-term intervention trials (varying from 4-12 weeks) evaluated the appetites of overweight and obese individuals on either a very low calorie (~800 calories daily) or ketogenic diet (no calorie restriction but ≤50 gm carbohydrate daily) using a standardized and validated appetite scale. None of the studies compared the two diets with each other; rather, the participants’ appetites were compared at baseline before starting the diet and at the end. Despite losing a significant amount of weight on both diets, participants reported less hunger and a reduced desire to eat compared with baseline measures. The authors noted the lack of increased hunger despite extreme restrictions of both diets, which they theorized were due to changes in appetite hormones such as ghrelin and leptin, ketone bodies, and increased fat and protein intakes. The authors suggested further studies exploring a threshold of ketone levels needed to suppress appetite; in other words, can a higher amount of carbohydrate be eaten with a milder level of ketosis that might still produce a satiating effect? This could allow inclusion of healthful higher carbohydrate foods like whole grains, legumes, and fruit. [9]

Which yogurt is lowest in carbs

×